CHERRY HILL'S HORSEKEEPING NEWSLETTER
  2008 Cherry Hill           www.horsekeeping.com

March 2008

Becoming
An Effective Rider
101 Arena Exercises
Trail Riding
Rider's Fitness
Program
How To Think
Like A Horse
Your Horse Barn DVD
101 Longeing and Long Lining Exeercises
Horse Tack Care and Cleaning by Cherry Hill
Horse Tack Care and Cleaning by Cherry Hill
How to Think Like A Horse by Cherry Hill

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BACK IN THE SADDLE !

Happy Spring to you and your equine buddies !

Boy the hair is really slipping here at Long Tail Ranch. The days are getting longer and the weather nicer. Like you, we are looking forward to a great riding season. As you gear up, take the time to read my series "Back in the Saddle". Look for the sections that apply to you the most. To get you started, here is Part One of 9 Parts. Have a great time reading and riding !

Back in the Saddle Part One: Evaluation

Attitude and Confidence
    2006 Cherry Hill      www.horsekeeping.com

Have you been riding your computer or your truck more than your horse? Has an injury or surgery prevented you from riding? Maybe you've had a brutal winter or scorching summer and six months zipped past without a ride. If it's time for you to get back in the saddle, with a little preparation you can make a smooth re-entry to riding.

After riding most of my life and teaching and judging many riders, I've seen that certain attributes can help or hinder a rider. Whether you are getting back to riding or taking it up for the first time, you should evaluate your attitude, confidence, relaxation, balance, flexibility, coordination, durability, strength, and fitness. Next month's newsletter will contain tips on how to improve areas that need work.

ATTITUDE   

A good attitude is made of motivation, optimism, diligence, patience, and honesty.

TEST: Answer Yes or No to these five questions:

1. You get up an hour earlier every morning so you have extra time to ride.
2. You see something ahead that might spook your horse. You alter your course to avoid the confrontation.
3. Your horse moves 3 small steps when you are mounting. You "let it go".
4. You want to smooth out your horse's lope but after several weeks you don't see a change. You start looking for another horse.
5. When your instructor/trainer says, "Work with your horse every day to improve your riding", you say, "I do!"

Yes to #1 shows motivation.
No to #2 shows a positive attitude that you can overcome your horse's fears.
No to #3 shows diligence to work on small things to make the whole better.
No to #4 means you don't give up quickly; training takes time.
Yes to #5 either means you are a rare person that can work with your horse every day OR your definition of "work" includes grooming, petting and feeding treats OR you just say "I do" to your instructor to keep from getting a lecture. To improve, you first must make an honest evaluation.

CONFIDENCE  

Confidence comes from knowledge, training, and experience.

TEST: Answer Yes or No to these questions:

1. Have you had your horse handling and riding skills evaluated by a professional instructor?
2. Do you take regular lessons?
3. Do you know safe practices for handling and riding horses?
4. Do you work with a well-trained, experienced horse that can "show you the ropes"?
5. Do you know how to stop a runaway horse?

If you answered YES to these five questions, you have set yourself up to be confident.


Read these other articles in the Back In The Saddle series:

Part One: Evaluation

Part Two: Improvement

 

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