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Horse Training, Horse Care, and Riding Books and Videos from Cherry Hill at www.horsekeeping.comHorse Training, Horse Care, and Riding Books and Videos from Cherry Hill at www.horsekeeping.com   Horse Training, Horse Care, and Riding Books and Videos from Cherry Hill at www.horsekeeping.com  

Horse Training, Horse Care, and Riding Books and Videos from Cherry Hill at www.horsekeeping.com

September 6, 2008

Half Stalls

  2008 Cherry Hill   Copyright Information

 

Cherry,

Although we have the majority of your horse books, we have seen nothing regarding a trend we've heard about: 1/2 stalls for horses in the barn.

The shell of our new barn is now finished (after 10 months of waiting!) and we're ready to start building our stalls. Several people have encouraged us to build "1/2 stalls" .... meaning there are no bars at the top of each panel separating the horses from each other. The dividers of each stall would be about 5 foot tall -- but no bars on the sides or front.

We literally jumped into horses 2 years ago -- so we don't know if this would be a good idea or a bad idea -- but we don't want to mess up before we even get to bring our horses home from the stable they've been at for the last couple years.

Thank you! Bob and Christa

 

Hi Bob and Christa,

Horse HousingHalf stalls or half-wall stalls might or might not be a good idea. First some pros and cons, and then I'll pose a few questions for you to consider regarding your own situation.

Pros

  • Less material
  • Allows horses to interact socially, such as play, mutually groom etc.
  • Allows horse to feel less confined, hanging heads over into aisle, other horse's stall
  • Airy look and feel to the barn

Cons

  • Allows horses to interact negatively - that is reach over into another horse's space, possibly bite or fight and chew on manes, blankets etc.
  • Allows horses to reach out into the aisle when a person or another horse is passing (can become an annoying or dangerous game)

How to Think Like A Horse by Cherry HillNow, depending on your current horses and any that you plan to add to your barn, they may or may not get along with half stalls. Some horses become quite dominant in stall situations and might keep a neighbor away from a shared wall with lunging and biting. I've always thought of a stall as a horse's own space, his sanctuary where he can rest and feel safe. In a regular style stall, a troublesome neighbor can be bad enough, but with half wall stalls, an aggressive horse could usurp a substantial portion of the more passive horse's stall.

Also, depending on the height of your horses and the final height of your half walls, half walls can be a potential risk if a horse rears up in play with a neighbor and then gets forelegs over the wall. And a large horse, like a Warmblood, that doesn't accept confinement could attempt to jump out of the stall.

I'd love to hear what you decide and how it works out for you.

Best of luck,

    Ask Cherry Hill

      2008 Cherry Hill   Copyright Information

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