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Horse Training, Horse Care, and Riding Books and Videos from Cherry Hill at www.horsekeeping.comHorse Training, Horse Care, and Riding Books and Videos from Cherry Hill at www.horsekeeping.com   Horse Training, Horse Care, and Riding Books and Videos from Cherry Hill at www.horsekeeping.com  

Horse Training, Horse Care, and Riding Books and Videos from Cherry Hill at www.horsekeeping.com

February 14, 2009

Troublesome Teeth?

  2009 Cherry Hill   Copyright Information

Hi Cherry,

I have inherited a 16-year-old mare from my sister who got married and moved into town. This horse is real nice in lots of ways. She's good to handle, isn't pushy and doesn't mind having here feet worked on. One thing I've noticed,however, is that when she eats she tilts and twists her head to the side and moves her tongue funny. Also, I'm finding lots of feed in her water tub. This doesn't seem normal. Should I have the vet out?

Thanks, Brandy

 

Dear Brandy,

Horse Health Care by Cherry HillOdd head movements when eating and feed deposits in the horse's water could be indications that your mare is having trouble chewing her food because her teeth have worn unevenly. Here is an excerpt from my book, Horse Health Care:

"Because the upper jaw is wider that the lower jaw, sharp points form on the outside edge (cheek surface) of the upper molars and the inside edge (tongue surface) of the lower molars. These need to be regularly filed off.

"IF YOUR HORSE SHOWS ANY OF THESE SIGNS,
HE MAY BE ASKING FOR A DENTAL APPOINTMENT

* drops feed wads while eating
* hay and grain in water bucket
* hold his head at an odd angle while chewing
* doesn't eat
* horse is in poor condition
* very bad mouth odor
* tosses or shakes his head when wearing a bridle
* roots his nose up into the air when you apply pressure with the bridle reins
* resists turning one way or the other

"Horses should have a dental check up annually. At this time, your veterinarian or equine dentist can float your horse's molars, that is, take off their sharp edges with a special file called a float. At the same time, if your horse's wolf teeth, canines, or shedding molars need attention, they can also be taken care of."

101 Horsekeeping Tips DVDHere is a video clip from our DVD, 101 Horsekeeping Tips, that explains about floating a horse's teeth.

Ask Cherry Hill

  2008 Cherry Hill   Copyright Information

 

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