Authentic Native American Indian Lakota Dreamcatcher

Horse Training, Horse Care, and Riding Books and Videos from Cherry Hill at www.horsekeeping.com   Home | BooksArticles | Shopping | View Cart | Contact | Site Map | Search

HK Item #DC50
Four Colors Eagle Willow Dreamcatcher
Alan Monroe - Lakota

Shopping  <   Home Items  <   Dreamcatchers

Authentic Native American Four Colors Eagle Willow Dreamcatcher 10-inch diameter by Lakota Alan Monroe

Paula wondered:
“Can I add things to my dreamcatcher?“

"One of my first dreamcatchers was made by Apache artist Cynthia Whitehawk. When I brought it home, I was immediately tempted to hook a beautiful amber seahorse on it but I didn’t want to interfere with the energy or power of Cynthia's beautiful creation. So before I added anything I asked her.

"She replied: 'Oh, Seahorse or whatever you choose to add to dream catchers are actually great. A dream catcher invites those personal totems that bring one smiles, good thoughts, powerful energy . . . we are just providing a start, giving a direction to go. Healing is a very personal thing, as you well know.' “

Alan Monroe - Lakota
Four Colors Eagle Willow
Dreamcatcher

DC50 -$78 plus s/h
(ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)

    View your  Horsekeeping Videos and Books shopping cart.

Paula says - "This dreamcatcher was handmade from South Dakota white willow by Lakota artist Alan Monroe. No wire or metal is used in the construction of this dreamcatcher. When indicated, there are metal beads, cones and other metal adornments."

"The feathers on this willow dreamcatcher are turkey feathers that he hand painted to look like Eagle feathers. Eagles are protected by the Migratory Bird Act and their feathers cannot legally be sold."

  • 10" diameter hoop of South Dakota white willow
  • turkey feather hand-painted like eagle with black and tan trade cloth wrap
  • four color glass crow beads, red, yellow, black, white
  • bell, white horse hair and metal cone accents

 

See More Dreamcatchers

 

Questions or more details.

Store Policies

Alan Monroe was born in Hot Springs , South Dakota and is an enrolled member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe. He graduated from Hot Springs High School and studied business and art in Nebraska, Tennessee, and South Dakota. Alan creates his Northern Plains artwork from hides, stone, leather, and wood. He learned the basics of quill working, weaponry, sculpting and pipe making from traditional and contemporary artisans in his family circle. He is a fifth generation master pipe maker. In his sculptures, Monroe works with a variety of materials such as pipestone, bone, wood and alabaster. He creates small objects like fetishes to large pieces than can weigh hundreds of pounds. Monroe's work can be seen in many galleries and museums across the country and he has won many awards. About Lakota Sioux


DREAMCATCHERS are known to the Indigenous peoples of the Americas to filter and destroy bad dreams, thoughts or negative influences, allowing the good, positive and enlightening influences and strong healing to take place. Totems, fetishes, ritual and ceremonial items significant to the owner are added for additional healing energies. Read more about dreamcatchers . . .

CROW BEADS are cut from colored tubes of glass or plastic and tumbled and polished to give a smooth rounded, slightly oval finish. They commonly range in size from 6mm to 9mm with a 3mm hole. Crow beads are popular for decorating medicine bags, hair braids and some Native American styles of jewelry.

EAGLE: The eagle is a symbol of power, healing and wisdom. The eagle represents enlightenment reached through inner work, understanding and reclaiming our personal power. Tenacity, clear vision and patience, living in balance with Spirit and Earth. Eagle connects one with Great Spirit, the Great Mystery, opening the soul to greater healing. It tells you that the universe is giving you the opportunity to fly above your life's worldly levels, or above the shadow of past realities, granting yourself permission to be free in order to reach all the joy that your heart desires and Spirit requires.

THE FOUR SACRED COLORS - Many Native Americans view the world as having four directions. Each direction has a special meaning and color associated with it. The Lakota use the colors black, red, yellow and white to represent the four directions. For some, the colors represent the four seasons and the changes we make on our journey through life. Every tribe and every person has their own beliefs and you should use what best represents what you believe.

 

Home | BooksArticles | Shopping | View Cart | Contact | Site Map | Search

  2017 Horsekeeping LLC   Copyright Information