Hand Made Native American Lakota Indian Gourd Rattle Necklaces

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Alan Monroe - Lakota
Birdhouse Mini Gourd Rattle Necklaces

HK Item #RT944

Shopping  <   Ceremonial Items  <  Rattles

Authentic Native American Birdhouse mini gourd Rattle Necklaces by Lakota Alan Monroe

Size
Total length 34", can be tied any length from 10" to 34" Approximately 1 3/4" diameter, 2 1/2" tall
Materials
natural gourd, buckskin leather lacing, leather disc on base, glass crow beads, solid brass beads, European glass trade beads, glass beads inside that rattle and swoosh
Hallmark
Certificate of Authenticity included
Artist
Alan Monroe, Oglala Lakota

Authentic Native American Birdhouse mini gourd Rattle Necklaces by Lakota Alan Monroe

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Alan Monroe - Lakota
Birdhouse Mini Gourd
Rattle Necklaces
RT944A - Horse
$145
plus s/h  
SOLD
RT944B - Raven
$145
plus s/h  
 
(ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)
RT944C - Raven
$145
plus s/h  
 
(ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)

Paula says - "These handmade rattle necklaces are called Birdhouse Mini Gourds. They have glass beads inside that rattle and swoosh."

Authentic Native American Birdhouse mini gourd Rattle Necklaces by Lakota Alan Monroe

Authentic Native American Birdhouse mini gourd Rattle Necklaces by Lakota Alan Monroe

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Alan Monroe - Oglala Lakota

Alan Monroe creates his Northern Plains artwork from hides, stone, leather, and wood. He learned the basics of quill working, weaponry, sculpting and pipe making from traditional and contemporary artisans in his family circle. He is a fifth generation pipe maker and considered by many to be a master pipe maker. In his sculptures, Monroe works with a variety of materials such as pipestone, bone, wood and alabaster. He creates small objects like fetishes to large pieces than can weigh hundreds of pounds. Al Monroe's work can be seen in many galleries and museums across the country and he has won many awards. Al Monroe was born in Hot Springs , South Dakota and is an enrolled member of the Oglala Sioux Tribe. He graduated from Hot Springs High School and studied business and art in Nebraska, Tennessee, and South Dakota. About Lakota Sioux

RATTLES - Native American rattles have been and are used for many purposes including healing and other medicine uses, dancing for ceremony and celebration, commemorating birth and more. To First Nations people, shakers or rattles represent rain (for prayers of abundance and prosperity) and tears, especially those of emotional release. Tears of joy signifying when the mind, body, soul and spirit connect. Ceremonially, rattles are used in cleansing and purifying, spiritual guidance work, celebration and in thanks and respect to Ancestral Spirits.

Rattles can be made of many materials including deer and elk hooves, rawhide, turtle shells, gourds, wood, buffalo parts (horn, hump bone, scrotum) bones, horns and antlers of all kinds, leather (cowhide, buckskin, elkskin).

The rattling items are either inside or outside. Rattles such as gourds might have small items inside such as beans, corn, small stones, or even the seeds native to the gourd itself. Rattles with external sound makers are adorned with pieces of metal, tinkle cones, bells, beads and more.

Generally, medicine rattles are made entirely of natural materials and the sound is more muted. Dance rattles are made of almost any materials, natural and otherwise. In fact, unusual items such as pieces of scrap metal, coins and other resonating materials are used to create a loud, crisp sound. Dance rattles are often made like a coup stick, using bone or wood with a handle on the end.


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