Horse Fly Gear for Riding

Horse Training, Horse Care, and Riding Books and Videos from Cherry Hill at www.horsekeeping.com
from Cherry Hill
 

101 Horsekeeping
Tips - DVD
Becoming An Effective Rider
Your Horse Barn DVD
Horsekeeping On A Small Acreage

Home | BooksArticles | Shopping | View Cart | Contact | Site Map | Search

Natural fly protection with
Bare Skin Barrier

 

  Fly Gear for Riding Horses

2006  Cherry Hill   Copyright Information

 Some items listed in "Fly Masks Etc " can be used while riding or there may be similar items specially designed for riding. A muzzle or ear bonnet designed to be used with a bridle, for example, can greatly reduce or eliminate bug-related head shaking. A blaze orange cape can make for a safer ride during hunting season.

Fly Cape

Have you ever been riding when your horse started prancing and violently swishing his tail—then you finally turn around and see there is a big horse fly feeding on the center of your horse’s rump, just where he can’t reach it? A fly cape that extends behind the saddle to cover the horse’s rump and flanks can eliminate that problem and decrease tail swishing better than fly spray can. A cape made of open weave polyvinyl keeps hot sun off the horse and is also said to wick moisture away from a sweating horse. For added fly protection spray the cape with fly spray.

Tassels

Horsehair tassels (“shoo-flies”) and other devices can be hung from bridles and saddles to swing with the movement of the horse and prevent flies from landing. Shoo-flies can be attached to a bridle at the throatlatch, curb strap, browband, or at the sides of the headstall. They are traditionally used on the front or rear cinches to keep flies away from the legs and the belly. Tassels on the ends of reins are useful for brushing flies off a horse’s neck and shoulders as you ride. Let long saddle strings dangle—they help keep flies off a horse’s flanks.

Browband

There are many different styles of browband or bonnet fly chasers—hanging strings, ribbons, loosely woven fabric. They slip on or attach to the headstall to hang over or above the horse’s eyes to keep flies at bay.

 

2006  Cherry Hill   Copyright Information

Home | BooksArticles | Shopping | View Cart | Contact | Site Map | Search

 

The information contained on this site is provided for general informational and educational purposes only.
The suggestions and guidelines should not be used as the sole answer for a visitor's specific needs.