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Vintage Navajo Sterling Silver
Turquoise / Coral Reversible
Squash Blossom Necklace
HK Item #N166

Shopping  <  Jewelry  <  Vintage Jewelry  <  Vintage Necklaces

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Naja is 2 1/2" tall by 2 1/4" wide.

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Size
24 inches long end to end, measured inside neckline when stretched out
13 3/4" from clasp to bottom of naja when fastened
Naja is 2 1/2" tall by 2 1/4" wide
12 squash blossoms 1 1/2" x 3/4"
Materials
Turquoise, coral, Read about stones
Sterling Silver, Read about silver
Weight
153 grams
Hallmark
R. A. F.    STERLING
Artist
Navajo (possibly Ray Fiero)
Origin
Vintage from 1970s to 1990s, but never used.
Read Below

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

13 3/4" from clasp to bottom of naja when fastened.

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

There are 12 squash blossoms 1 1/2" x 3/4".
Coral on one side, turquoise on the other.

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Vintage Navajo Sterling Silver
Turquoise and Coral
Reversible Squash Blossom Necklace
#N166 (ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)

$995 SOLD

See More Vintage Necklaces

Paula says - "This beautiful necklace is turquoise on one side and coral on the other side. It was made in the 1970s but was never used - it is brand new vintage!"

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Stamped "STERLING" on one end of the naja and "R.A.F." on the other end.

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

Navajo  turquoise coral squash blossom necklace

See More Vintage Necklaces

Store Policies

White Buffalo Navajo Pawn Collection White Buffalo Collection

We recently purchased a large collection of vintage but unused Native American artifacts including jewelry, rugs and pottery. It was part of the estate of a Navajo woman who was a missionary that worked with Native Americans in Four Corners - the area of the American southwest where four states meet- New Mexico, Arizona, Utah and Colorado. As a single parent, she raised 5 daughters and a son while also providing food, shelter, and clothing to less fortunate people that needed assistance. Often she was thanked for her help by gifts of Native American items.

Most of the items in this collection are from the 1970s to the 1990s. We offer these items to you with great respect and with the information we received from the family plus our research.

We named the collection after one of the pieces in the group, a hand carved Navajo fetish necklace honoring the Sacred White Buffalo.


BUFFALO MEDICINE - The appearance of White Buffalo is a sign that prayers are being heard, that the sacred pipe and Spirit are being honored. White Buffalo signals a time of abundance, prosperity and thankfulness. Buffalo was the major source of sustenance for indigenous cultures of the plains, giving meat for food, hides for shelter and clothing, and Spirit Medicine. The Medicine of Buffalo is prayer, gratitude and praise for that which has been received. Buffalo Medicine is also knowing that abundance is present when all relations are honored as sacred, and when gratitude is expressed to every living part of creation, recognizing the sacredness of every walk of life.

 

What makes it a squash blossom necklace
and why are there so many of them?

Native American Jewelry Blog tips and iinformation
Squash, corn and beans are important foods for the Native American people of the US southwest. They are often used in a symbolic way in jewelry and ceremonies.

Some say the Navajo squash blossom necklace has a connection to southwestern agriculture, other say the the spread petal design is just that, a design, and that is was only after white man asked, “what is this, what does it mean” did the name squash blossom come to be. Yet others say the Navajo copied a similar Spanish design of the pomegranate – look at the end of the pomegranate below and compare it to the “squash blossom” bead.

The Navajo word for the “squash blossom” bead means “bead that spreads out” so it would seem to me that the original intent was design not squash. But what do I know, I wasn’t around in 1880 when spread beads first appeared.

Whichever is the true account, it seems that originally Navajo silversmiths used simple silver bead necklaces to suspend their naja pendants.

In about 1880, the tri-petal form that we know as a squash blossom bead appeared. At first, tri-petal silver beads were simply interspersed with plain beads in a naja necklace. Then stones began to be added to the blossom beads partly to please the maker but mostly to satisfy customer demand.

While usually associated with Navajo silversmiths, squash blossom necklaces are also made and worn by Pueblo and Zuni people. Zuni necklaces usually feature needlepoint designs.

Although there can be any number of squash blossoms on each side of a necklace, there are often six on each side, making twelve squash blossoms and one central naja.

Full size squash blossom necklaces are often quite large and heavy and most suitable for occasional ceremonial wear. Smaller, lighter versions are made to be worn as everyday jewelry.

Why are there so many squash blossom necklaces around? Demand. During the Native American jewelry boom of the 1970s, the artists made them as fast as they sold. They were one of the most popular Native American jewelry purchases of that time.

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