Navajo Sterling Silver Horse Head Pendant

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Richard Singer - Navajo Sterling Silver
Storyteller Horse Pendant
HK Item #NP286

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Native American Navajo  Sterling Silver Storyteller Horse Head pendant

Height
2 1/4" long including bail
Width
1 1/2"
Thickness
1/4"
Materials
Sterling Silver
Read About Silver
Hallmarks
(on bail)
R. Singer (stamped in cursive)
A feather
Sterling
Artist
Richard Singer, Navajo

Native American Navajo  Sterling Silver Storyteller Horse Head pendant

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Richard Singer
Navajo
Sterling Silver
Storyteller Horse
Pendant

NP286 - $135 plus s/h
(ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)

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Paula says - "This is a beautifully shaped horse head with a wonderful horse dreaming story. It seems as if the horse is remembering an adventure in the mountains with a horse buddy.

"Amazingly detailed sterling silver overlay work with a background of textured oxidized silver that provides a striking contrast. A wonderful design."

Native American Navajo  Sterling Silver Storyteller Horse Head pendant

The large 3/4" diameter bail enables you to wear the pendant with silver beads, a stone necklace, bead or treasure necklace, a collar, heavy chain, leather, anything.

(Beads shown are not included.)

See Chains, Cables, Beads

Ways To Wear A Pendant

Richard Singer

The Singer family has been involved in silversmithing, stone and beadwork for a very long time, handing the art down from one generation to another. Richard Singers's father, Tommy Singer, grew up on in the community of Dilcon on the Navajo Reservation in Arizona and has been attributed as the first Native American artist to use chip inlay.

What is Overlay?

With silver overlay, there are two layers of silver - the top layer is a scene, figures, or symbols meticulously cut out and then placed over a solid silver bottom layer.

The bottom layer is the background behind the cutouts and is traditionally darkened (oxidized) for contrast. Navajo silversmiths typically leave the background smooth while Hopi usually etch the background with hashmarks.

The two layers are then “sweated” together - the silver is heated until the two layers meld.

The result is a 3-D picture with great depth and interest.


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