HK Item #DC162

Lakota Beaded Double Dreamcatcher
Four Sacred Colors

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Authentic Native American Lakota  Beaded Double Dreamcatcher

Authentic Native American Lakota  Beaded Double Dreamcatcher

3-dimensional, double sides.

Authentic Native American Lakota  Beaded Double Dreamcatcher

Lakota Beaded Double Dreamcatcher
Four Sacred Colors

DC162 -$126 plus s/h
(ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)

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Paula says - "Fewer and fewer Lakota artists are carrying on the beading traditions so these dreamcatchers are becoming more difficult to find each year. They are beautiful works of art.

"This double dreamcatcher is 3-dimensional - it had a beaded web on both sides of the hoop."

Authentic Native American Lakota  Beaded Double Dreamcatcher

  • 5" diameter
  • 8" fringe
  • 16" total length
  • Lakota hand made for Lakota Jewelry Visions owned and operated by Lakota artist Mitchell Zephier of Rapid City, South Dakota

Authentic Native American Lakota  Beaded Double Dreamcatcher

 

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About the Artists

Mitchell Charles Zephier Cétan Ho Wasté (Pretty Voice Hawk) Mitchell Zephier grew up on the Cheyenne River and Rosebud Indian reservations. After marrying on Roxanne Apple Rosebud he gave re-birth to Plains Indian Jewelry, particularly Lakota metal adornment. He has mentored over 34 apprentices in the arts of metal-smithing and marketing.

Mitch collaborates with fellow Lakota artists. Mitch has won numerous awards including first place at Red Earth Show, several awards at the internationally prestigious Sante Fe Indian Market as well as presented his work at far off Native American venues like Schimutzun Celebration in Connecticut. He has also earned the South Dakota Governor's award.

Mitch has other forms of artistic expression. His album Cherish the Children won a National Native Music Award for Best Children's Album. Mitchell Zephier's latest venture is to team up with fellow artists to explore, on film this time, the issues that affect the lives of Native Young People in Cloud Horse Production's Lakota 4 Life, a Zephier inspired look at the issues, decisions, responsibilities and opportunities facing Native Youth today.

Other family members and friends that work on the jewelry include his son Wakinyan Luta Zephier , Belle Starboy, Webster Two Hawk Jr., and Roger Dale Herron.

THE FOUR SACRED COLORS

Many Native Americans view the world as having four directions. Each direction has a special meaning and color associated with it. The Lakota use the colors black, red, yellow and white to represent the four directions. For some, the colors represent the four seasons and the changes we make on our journey through life. Every tribe and every person has their own beliefs and you should use what best represents what you believe. Read more about Four Directions . . .

Native American Jewelry Blog tips and iinformationWhat is a Dreamcatcher?

Some consider the dreamcatcher a symbol of unity among the various Indian Nations, and a general symbol of identification with Native American or First Nations cultures.

Dreamcatchers are an authentic American Indian tradition from the Ojibway (Chippewa) tribe. A dreamcatcher is a based on a hoop (traditionally of willow), on which is woven a net or web of sinew in a somewhat similar pattern to how the Ojibway tied webbing for snowshoes. A "dream-catcher" was hung in the sleeping area as a charm to protect children from nightmares. A legend holds that a dreamcatcher filters a person's dreams, letting through the good ones and trapping bad dreams in the web. Some believe that a dreamcatcher can help us remember our dreams.

Dreamcatchers are often decorated with personal and sacred items such as feathers, totems and beads. While these additions may make a dreamcatcher appealing and add to them as a work of art, it is suggested by some that such ornaments are not appropriate on dreamcatchers used for "catching dreams" as they could interfere with the spiraling motion of the web and can cause disturbing dreams.

Generally, a dreamcatcher is suspended near the place where you sleep, on the wall, or perhaps from a lampshade or bedpost.

Paula wondered: “Can I add things to my dreamcatcher?”

"When I took my large dreamcatcher home, I was immediately tempted to hook a beautiful amber seahorse on it but I didn’t want to interfere with the energy or power of Cynthia Whitehawk’s beautiful creation. So before I added anything I asked her.

"She replied: 'Oh, Seahorse or whatever you choose to add to dream catchers are actually great. A dream catcher invites those personal totems that bring one smiles, good thoughts, powerful energy . . . we are just providing a start, giving a direction to go. Healing is a very personal thing, as you well know.' ”

What is a Mandalla?

A Mandala is similar in shape to a dreamcatcher but it usually has no web. Instead, the hoop is filled with yarn, feathers, fur and usually has feathers hanging from the bottom. Mandala is something you hang for prosperity and good fortune on a door or wall inside your office, home, hogan, or tipi.

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