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Paul Mueller, Lakota
Rare Quill Buckskin Belt Bag
HK Item #MBL118

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Authentic Native American Indian buckskin beaded and painted pipe bag by Lakota artisan Paul Mueller

Authentic Native American Indian buckskin beaded and painted pipe bag by Lakota artisan Paul Mueller

Flowers of died quill. Seed bead trim.

Authentic Native American Indian buckskin beaded and painted pipe bag by Lakota artisan Paul Mueller

Seed bead refers to any small bead.

Paul Mueller, Lakota
Rare Quill Buckskin Belt Bag
#MBL118 (ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)

$175 plus s/h

material
black buckskin, porcupine quill, seed beads, horse hair, copper cones
size
5 1/2" x 4"; will fit up to 3" belt
artist
Paul Mueller, Lakota

Authentic Native American Indian buckskin beaded and painted pipe bag by Lakota artisan Paul Mueller

Authentic Native American Indian buckskin beaded and painted pipe bag by Lakota artisan Paul Mueller

Belt loops fit up to a 3" wide belt.
Horse hair tassles with copper cones.

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The Lakota are part of seven related Sioux tribes and speak Lakota, one of three major dialects of the Sioux language. Read about the Lakota People here.

About Porcupine Quill Work

Porcupine quill work is one of the oldest and fastest disappearing traditional Native American art forms. The Great Lakes and Plains Indians lived in the range of the porcupine and utilized the quills to decorate moccasins, sheaths, baskets, pipe stems and more. The porcupine was not sacrificed to obtain the quills, although porcupine meat is quite delicious. Instead the women of the tribe would throw a blanket over an unsuspecting porcupine who would release the quills as a defense and leave them in the blanket.

The quills are cleaned and dyed with plant origin colors such as buffalo berry for red, sunflower or cone flower for yellow, and wild grapes for black. Once dry, they are oiled so they wouldn't become brittle and shatter when sewing them.

Beading began replacing quillwork in the early 1800s and today there are only a few artists that work with porcupine quills.

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