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Catlinite Offering Pipes
by Alan Monroe, Oglala Lakota

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About Lakota Catlinite Offering Pipes

The Offering Pipe is a small scale, less expensive version of the Sacred Pipe and is meant to be used as an offering or give-away. Read more about offering pipes below.

Although fully functional as a smoking pipe, Offering Pipes are not intended to serve as long term, everyday smoking pipes or ceremonial pipes. For those purposes, see larger pipes and stems.

These offering pipes are handmade of solid sacred catlinite by fifth generation Oglala Lakota pipe maker Alan Monroe. The catlinite was mined from Alan Monroe's quarry at Pipestone National Monument in Pipestone Minnesota. Pipestone has naturally-occurring color variations and sometimes lighter areas called "power spots" so the item you receive might vary slightly in appearance from the items pictured on this page.

Bowls are 1/2" inside diameter.

Each pipe comes with an ash stem.

Dime in photo at left shows scale of pipes.

Catlinite Lakota wolf offering pipe with ash stem

Bowl approximately 2" long; 1 1/4" tall'; 1" wide.
Approx. 10" long with stem.

4 Directions Buffalo - COP-30 - $83     

Catlinite Lakota O-Horse offering pipe with ash stem

Bowl approximately 2 1/2" long; 1 3/4" tall'; 1" wide.
Approx. 10" long with stem.

O-Horse (Horse Looking Up) - COP-33 - $83   

Catlinite Lakota wolf offering pipe with ash stem

Bowl approximately 2 1/4" long; 1 1/4" tall'; 1" wide.
Approx. 10" long with stem.
(ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)

Wolf - COP-24 - $83     

Catlinite Lakota walking bear offering pipe with ash stem

Bowl approximately 2 1/2" long; 1 1/2" tall'; 1" wide.
Approx. 10" long with stem.
(ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)

Walking Bear - COP-27 - $83   

Authentic Native American Catlinite raven offering pipe with ash stem by Lakota Alan Monroe

Bowl approximately 2" long; 2" tall'; 1" wide.  Approx. 10" long with stem.

Raven - COP-28 - $83   

Catlinite Lakota wolf offering pipe with ash stem

Bowl approximately 2 3/4" long; 2" tall'; 1 1/4" wide.
Approx. 10 3/4" long with stem.

Ram - COP-31 - $83     

Catlinite Lakota buffalo offering pipe

Bowl approximately 2 1/4" long; 1 3/8" tall'; 3/4" wide.
Approx. 10" long with stem.

Buffalo - COP-20 - $83     

Catlinite Lakota owl offering pipe with ash stem

Bowl is approximately 2 1/4" long; 2" tall'; 1" wide.
Approx. 10" long with stem.

Owl - COP-26 - $83   
(ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)

Catlinite Lakota turtle offering pipe

Bowl approximately 2 1/4" long; 3/4" tall'; 1 1/2" wide.
Approx. 10" long with stem.

(ONLY ONE AVAILABLE)

Turtle - COP-34 - $79   

Catlinite Lakota walking bear offering pipe with ash stem

Bowl approximately 2 1/2" long; 2" tall'; 1" wide.
Approx. 10" long with stem.

Looking Forward Horse - COP-29 - $83   

Approx 10" long with stem

T-Pipe - COP-18 - $50   

Authentic Native American Catlinite eagle offering pipe with stem by Lakota Alan Monroe

Bowl approximately 2 1/2" long; 1" tall'; 1" wide.  Approx. 10" long with stem.

Eagle - COP-23 - $83   

Approx 10" long with stem.

L-Pipe - COP-19 - $40   

 

catlinite pipestone offering pipe alan monroe oglala lakota

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"WHEN YOU PRAY WITH THIS PIPE, YOU PRAY FOR AND WITH EVERYTHING.”
- BLACK ELK

Paula says - The quarries at Pipestone National Monument are sacred to many people because the pipestone quarried here is carved into pipes used for prayer. Many believe that the pipe’s smoke carries one’s prayer to the Great Spirit. The traditions of quarrying and pipemaking continue today. Read more about Sacred Red Pipestone from Minnesota on my blog."

The Pipestone Offering Pipe

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The Offering Pipe is a small scale, less expensive version of the Sacred Pipe and is meant to be used as an offering or give-away.

In many cultures, offerings are left at sacred sites and as a gift to the Spirits. In Native American culture, offerings might be left each time someone passes a certain way or takes water from a spring or stones from a mine. An offering can also be left for a person (alive or dead) or for a Spirit as a symbol of thanks and respect. The offering might be tobacco, food, money, flowers, craftwork or special objects. When a person goes on a Vision Quest the pipe that he smoked during that time would be one of the greatest offerings he could make to the Spirits. The Offering Pipe by Alan Monroe is perfect for such uses. When left as an offering, the pipe is separated from the stem and traditionally wrapped in red cloth which represents the red road or the good path. The bundle can be tucked in a rock crevice or a tree at the appropriate location.

A Give-Away Pipe also has tradition in Native American culture. When someone dies, there is a ceremony similar to a wake where people come to pay respects to the departed. Sometimes an Offering Pipe is placed in the casket for burial with the deceased. (See above.) Also, the family passes out gifts to family and friends at this time as a symbol of the tradition of giving away some of the deceased's belongings. This is where a Give-Away pipe might be used.

A year after the person has passed, a feast is held in the person's honor and the rest of the person's belongings are given away. This is another instance where a Give-Away pipe would be suitable to exchange between family and friends of the deceased.

Choosing a Catlinite Pipe

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If you are looking for an Offering Pipe or Give-Away Pipe, see above.

For a personal pipe, generally the L-shaped bowls are thought to be for a woman, a single man or for an everyday smoking pipe.

The T-shaped bowls are for a man or a family pipe. The nose of the pipe represents a man coming of age.

The animal effigy pipes are for those who have aligned with a particular animal spirit.

The pipes we sell at Horsekeeping.com are new pipes. They have not been smoked or blessed.

Thank you to Alan Monroe, fourth generation Oglala Lakota pipe maker from South Dakota, for his amazing high quality pipes and works of art and for some of the information used in this article.

Using a Catlinite Pipe

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The bowl and stem are separated and carried along with a tamper, the smoking mixture and other smoking accessories in a bag or pouch.

Each person has their own ritual about handing and smoking their pipe. It usually starts by smudging (purifying) the pipe and all of its parts and accessories in the smoke of sage, sweet grass, pine or cedar.

Once the pipe has been purified, the stem is connected to the bowl, the stem being viewed as male and the bowl as female.

Important - How to insert the stem into the pipe.

CAUTION - Never force the stem into the pipe hole.

The stem is designed to fit snugly, not tightly. Do not try and seat the shoulders of the stem up to the pipe bowl. If you force the stem into the barrel, you will likely break the pipestone.

Instead . . . Moisten the tapered insert end of the stem with your lips. Insert the stem into the pipe barrel and gently give it ¼ turn. This will give the stem a good hold on the inside of the barrel. The slight moisture will swell the stem insert slightly which results in a snug fit.

If you treat a pipe with respect, it will last a long time.

A certain number of pinches of the smoking mixture are added to the bowl in ceremony. Each pinch is smudged before loading in the bowl. (Read about smudging.)

The smoking of the pipe generally consists of puffing on it, not inhaling it. It is viewed as a means of sending one's prayers to the Great Spirit and making a connection between the earthly world and the spiritual world.

As the pipe is passed, one holds the pipe in the left hand while using the right hand to wave the smoke over the top of one's own head as a blessing. When speaking to the Great Spirit, often the stem of the pipe is pointed toward the sky.

In the hands of a medicine man, his sacred pipe is full of mysterious power and able to accomplish many things for the health, safety and well-being of his people.

When smoking is finished, the pipe is again treated with great respect as the bowl is cleaned, the stem is detached from the bowl, the pipe is blessed and stored in its special bundle or pouch.

Storing a Catlinite Pipe

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According to Native American tradition, once a pipe has been smoked and blessed the first time, the bowl and stem of the pipe should only be joined for smoking. When they are joined, during smoking, the spirit of the pipe is released. After the ceremony, the bowl should be separated from the stem and they should be stored that way. If you store or display a pipe with the stem and bowl connected, the spirit is free to roam.

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